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Patient Education and Eye Safety

Vision Performance and Safety

The best way to treat an eye injury is to prevent it from occurring. Lexington Eye Associates has a leadership role in eye safety. The following recommendations, printed on the reverse side of all LEA spectacle prescriptions, should help you choose appropriate protective eyewear.

 

 

Lexington Eye Safety Recommendations

I. The Mechanics and Prevention of Sports Eye Injuries by: Paul Vinger, M.D. (2.6 MB)

II. The recommendations of the American Academy of Ophthalmology for sports eyewear. (971KB)

III. Protective Eyewear for Young Athletes Joint Policy Statement: American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Sports Medicine and Fitness, American Academy of Ophthalmology, Eye Health and Public Information Task Force (71KB)


A Systematic Approach To Eye Injury Prevention, Paul F. Vinger, M.D.


Eye SafetyEyewear should be fabricated with highly shatter-resistant polycarbonate or Trivex lenses unless there is a specific reason for another lens material. Children, functionally one-eyed people and active adults require polycarbonate or Trivex lenses.

For sports that have the potential for eye contact, use eyewear that is certified by the Protective Eyewear Certification Council (www.protecteyes.org) to ASTM F803. ASTM F803 covers the racquet sports, women's lacrosse and field hockey, baseball, and basketball. For other sports, such as soccer, protectors should meet or exceed ASTM F803 standard specifications for squash. Prescription sports eyewear requires 3-mm-thick polycarbonate lenses
Sports with high impact, such as ice hockey, men's lacrosse, and youth baseball (batter/base runner) require a face shield mounted on a helmet designed for the sport. Paintball protectors must conform to the requirements of ASTM F1776.

People working with exposure to flying chips or with power tools should use protectors that meet ANSI Z87.1 Goggles are the safest. Only polycarbonate or Trivex lenses should be used.

Many workplace activities, such as using a chain saw, require, in addition to safety glasses or goggles, a helmet with a face shield designed for the activity.

Sunglasses should conform to the above safety recommendations. Sunglasses lenses should attenuate blue light, which is potentially hazardous to the macula. Gray, amber, or brown lenses are preferred. Blue-colored sunglass lenses that transmit blue light should not be used.

Leading Multi-Specialty Eye Care

Most of our physicians have sub-specialty fellowship training in pediatric ophthalmology, glaucoma, retinal disease and surgery, oculoplastics and cosmetics, and corneal and refractive surgery.

Leading Multi-Specialty Eye Care

Premium Lens Implant Technology

With the latest advances, having clear vision at only one distance is no longer the only option.

Premium Lens Implant Technology

Cutting-Edge Glaucoma Treatment

Lexington Eye Associates has the most advanced diagnostic tools available to help to determine whether or not a patient has glaucoma, to assess the type of glaucoma that is present, and also to monitor the disease over time. 

Cutting-Edge Glaucoma Treatment

Advances in Macular Degeneration

We offer patients in Massachusetts the most advanced diagnostic equipment. Our fellowship trained retina specialists are skilled in the state-of-the-art treatments that are preventing vision loss.

Advances in Macular Degeneration

The Latest in Corneal Transplants

Advanced technology now allow for minimally invasive surgery by targeting disease and performing partial thickness transplantation, such as DSAEK surgery.

The Latest in Corneal Transplants

Current Therapy for Lazy Eye

Our pediatric ophthalmologists are the most highly skilled specialists in Massachusetts for treatment of Lazy Eye, Amblyopia and other related eye disorders.

Current Therapy for Lazy Eye